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What is a Frenectomy Procedure for Tongue-Tie?

Tongue-tie is a condition present at birth that causes a range of problems, and a simple procedure called a “frenectomy” is the best treatment.Tongue-tie is when the tongue is restricted because it’s connected too tightly to the floor of the mouth by connective tissue called the “frenulum.” The condition is often misunderstood, even among physicians and other health professionals who work in Labor and Delivery. This is unfortunate, since the most beneficial time to treat tongue-tie is when a baby is still a newborn. Immediate Problems Caused by Tongue-Tie The most serious problem caused by tongue-tie beginning at birth is that breastfeeding is very difficult and causes mom excessive pain. The baby’s tongue doesn’t have the needed freedom and movement to properly breastfeed. In trying to nurse, babies find that it’s too painful. They end up making compensations in their attempt to get nourishment. Whether they simply take much longer…

Does your Baby Make Tongue/Lip Tie Breastfeeding Compensations?

Tongue tie and lip tie can both make breastfeeding difficult and painful for babies. As a result, some infants manage to shift their approach, relieve the pain, and get needed nourishment. Two results are that feeding times are prolonged, as is pain for the mother. Other things are going on at the same time, however, that create long-term negative effects. Overall, what’s happening is proof of two things. First, weight gain should not be considered a universal measure of successful breastfeeding. Secondly, greater awareness is needed regarding the importance of identifying and repairing tongue/lip tie. More details follow. How Babies Compensate for Tongue/Lip Tie Pain during Breastfeeding Tongue tie and lip tie are both conditions that interfere with the ability to successfully breastfeed. The following are some methods babies use to adapt to the situation, but the outcomes do not equate to successful breastfeeding. Prolonged Breastfeeding A baby with high…

Myth-Dispelling Facts about Tongue-Tie

Myth-Dispelling Facts about Tongue-Tie In spite of astounding progress in the field of medicine, there is ongoing controversy about tongue-tie. Remarkably, the debate includes whether or not tongue-tie even exists. Some medical specialists dismiss tongue-tie as a myth. Yet, countless individuals can attest from personal experience that it is an existing condition associated with a wide range of problems. Mothers of breastfeeding babies are a considerable percentage of those who have no doubt that their child had tongue-tie that was remedied by a frenectomy. Below, learn more about tongue-tie, what causes it, symptoms of the condition, frenectomies, and more. What is Tongue-Tie? Ankyloglossia or tongue-tie is caused by a frenulum that restricts the tongue. The frenulum is also known as the lingual frenulum, and it is the small fold of membrane that connects the tongue to the floor of the mouth. If the frenulum is short or especially tight, tongue…

Newborn With Tongue-Tie

What to do if My Newborn has Tongue-Tie Are you concerned that your newborn may have tongue-tie? Approximately 4% of all babies have ankyloglossia, also known as tongue-tie. This is a condition in which the frenulum is too short or connects to the tongue toward the front. The frenulum or frenum is the membrane that connects the skin underneath the tongue. There are different degrees of the condition, which are determined by how close the frenulum reaches to the tip of the tongue. When the tongue looks heart-shaped along the edge, it’s because the center of the tongue is being pulled back by the frenulum. Not all tongue ties and lip ties need to be released. However problems can result from tongue-tie, the earlier the diagnosis and treatment, the better the outcome. There are solutions for ankyloglossia, when needed. A newborn’s tongue-tie can make breastfeeding difficult A baby’s tongue is…

Understanding Tongue Tie, Impact on Breastfeeding, & More

Only about 3 percent of babies have tongue-tie (ankyloglossia), and a majority are male. This is a condition in which there is an abnormally short lingual frenulum, which is the thin piece of skin under the tongue. Tongue-tie can be a genetic condition passed on in families. The movement of the tongue is often restricted, resulting in various problems, including difficulty swallowing. The most notable complication that can occur from birth involves breastfeeding, and other issues may become evident later on. Tongue-Tie and Breastfeeding Multiple issues with tongue-tie can occur related to breastfeeding. A baby has to keep his tongue above the lower gum to breastfeed. An infant may have trouble latching on because he can’t move the tongue into the correct position. Instead of effectively sucking at the breast, the baby may only chew. As a result, the baby doesn’t get needed nutrition and the mother experiences significant nipple…