How to Prepare For Your Child’s Laser Tongue-Tie Treatment

How to Prepare For Your Child’s Laser Tongue-Tie Treatment


If your child has been diagnosed with a tongue-tie, a medical procedure known as a Frenectomy may be required to treat the condition. This is a simple treatment involving the use of a laser to surgically cut the frenulum and remove the tongue-tie. 

Laser Tots offers posterior tongue treatment services in Vaughan to help correct this condition. 

Although the surgery is safe and pain will be minimal, medical procedures can be scary for young children. Let’s examine some things you can do to effectively prepare for your child’s treatment.  

 

What Happens During a Frenectomy?

A Frenectomy is a quick and painless procedure in which a soft tissue laser is used to cut the piece of tissue that is connecting your child’s tongue to the bottom of the mouth. 

The laser effectively “vaporizes” the soft tissue, freeing up the tongue for a full range of movement. The laser itself also prevents bleeding by immediately cauterizing the tissue as well as eliminating bacteria in the area.

The procedure is very simple and you will be able to take your child home as soon as it is completed. A followup appointment will be scheduled by your doctor. 

 

Ask Your Doctor About Medication

A Frenectomy, using a soft tissue dental laser, usually does not require the child to take any medication beforehand and causes the child minimal pain. The laser itself has analgesic properties, reducing discomfort during the procedure; many children are able to sleep through it. 

However, every child reacts differently and it is a good idea to ask your doctor about having medication on hand in the event that your child experiences discomfort after the procedure. 

Some parents opt for homeopathic remedies or commercial products such as children’s Tylenol. The best course of action is to consult with your doctor before administering any medication to your child pre- or post-treatment. 

 

Mouth Exercises

A tongue-tie can lead to weak sucking patterns and difficulty feeding. You can help improve your child’s food intake using sucking exercises starting from when your child is diagnosed with tongue-tie, and you can do them up to four times each day prior to the procedure. Follow these easy steps:

– Carefully rub the lower gumline from one side to the other and allow your baby’s tongue to follow your fingers. This helps strengthen the tongue’s lateral movement.

– Guide your child to suck on your finger and slowly extract your finger while they attempt to suck it back in. This helps strengthen the tongue. 

– Guide your child to suck on your finger and gently apply pressure on the palate. When the baby begins sucking on your finger, carefully start pressing down with the back of your nail against the tongue. This will interrupt the sucking motion while the child pushes against you. Listen for a sound and then put your finger back up into the palate to re-stimulate sucking. Repeat as tolerated.

– Put one index finger inside the baby’s cheek and, with your thumb on the outside of the cheek, massage it on either side to reduce tension.

 

Consult Your Doctor About Special Preparation Methods

Each child is different and hence, each child’s healthcare needs are different. Your child’s healthcare provider understands their needs the best, it is always important to consult them prior to undergoing any medical procedures. They will be able to tell you how to best prepare your child for the upcoming procedure.

Make sure to always check with your child’s physician to ensure that they are adequately prepared and there are no special circumstances or actions required before the procedure.

 

Gep TOTs is Experienced in Safely Treating Tongue-Ties

Dr. Phu-My Gep at Gep TOTs Dental Group is experienced and certified to treat this condition. Dr. Gep is trained in using medical lasers to assist in quicker healing times and less post-operative pain. 

Time is of the essence! Contact us to set up an appointment today and get your child’s tongue-tie corrected.